Peshawar Attack: All the Mockingbirds We Lost

It’s been incredibly quite in this little corner of the worldwide web. To blame would be the ever-so-maddening demands of university life, and of course, my lack of inspiration. So then, what has compelled me to break through the (metaphorical of course) cobwebs that have settled upon this unkept blog of mine?

16 December 2014
would be my reply.

A date that will forever be synonymous with blackness, equating to the sorrowful image of children in green school uniforms fleeing with fear and terror. Certainly, on this date, we lost a little bit of this world’s innocence, as 132 children lost their lives in resultant of the harrowing Peshawar Attack. On this date, a Pakistan military school was attacked by the Pakistan Taliban, who aimed to execute their revenge upon the Pakistani military by means of such a vicious massacre.

Putting pen to paper, with this torn and grieving heart of mine, I am reminded of a lesson Atticus Finch parted to his daughter, Scout: “I wanted you to see what real courage is, instead of getting the idea that courage is a man with a gun in his hand. It’s when you know that you’re licked before you begin but you begin anyway and you see it through no matter what. You rarely win, but sometimes you do,” (Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird). Surely this phrase serves as our protestation cry, allowing us to demand, why do men with guns in their hands have so much power?

Allow To Kill a Mockingbird to remind us to practice kindness and sympathy – regardless of the despair, injustice and inequality we see in the world. Like Scout and Jem, we shall not let such acts of cruelty soil our faith, and our belief that goodness always prevails. Inna lillahi wa inna ilayhi raji’un.

Mockingbirds don’t do one thing except make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corn cribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us.
That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird
― Harper Lee, To Kill a Mockingbird

Advertisements